UPEC Livestreams: Keeping you connected with the UP environment

Our series of livestreams, co-hosted by Board President Horst Schmidt and Vice President Evan Zimmermann, keeps you up-to-date with environmental issues facing the Upper Peninsula.

Please note: as of November 2021, you can view all archived recordings of the livestreams anytime on UPEC’s Facebook page. Earlier posts below link to UPEC’s YouTube channel, which is no longer being used for this purpose.

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Mike Furmanski, the superintendent of Escanaba’s electric utility, explains the ins and outs of running the City of Escanaba’s utility, and the different types of utilities—investor owned, cooperatives, municipal—and the bulk power transmission system in Michigan, called MISO, plus other networks that allow us to receive seamless electrical service to our homes.


The second part of this episode of The Energy Show is “Bone of Contention: Line 5 in the Straits of Mackinac.” Your UPEC hosts, Horst Schmidt and Evan Zimmermann, wind through the current legal wrangles between the State of Michigan and Enbridge, the pipeline owner.


This UPEC “This Is It!” livestream featured Professor Chelsea Schelly of Michigan Technological University, who discussed intentional communities — planned residential living communities designed to have a high degree of social cohesion and collaboration through shared technologies, economies, and activities of daily life.  Several intentional communities were offered as examples of the diversity of forms they can take.

UPEC’s “This Is It!” livestream interactive conversation, held on June 27, 2020, explored new bipartisan legislation that could transform recycling and waste reduction in Michigan. Horst Schmidt and Evan Zimmermann, president and vice president of UPEC, respectively, hosted the livestream and presented the latest news on Michigan’s waste problems, past and present, and a recent bipartisan legislative move to address them. They’ll were joined by Sean Hammond, the policy director at the Michigan Environmental Council, who relayed what he has been working on during the past five years to change our waste to resources — bringing Michigan into the 21st century.